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TTA Novella 5: Engines Beneath Us by Malcolm Devlin
TTA Novella 5: Engines Beneath Us by Malcolm Devlin

TTA Novella 5: Engines Beneath Us by Malcolm Devlin

Regular price £7.00

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Rob is a Crescent kid. Born and raised in the sheltered circle of grey semis, built to house the employees of The City Works and their families. Under the eye of the reclusive Mr Olhouser, the residents of The Crescent go about their work, their lessons and their law, accompanied by the never-ending sound of The Works machinery deep under the ground.
When Lee Wrexler moves into The Crescent, he brings with him something dangerous from the outside. Not just a reputation for trouble, but an outside perspective that will ultimately show Rob that the home he always thought he had a measure of is a stranger and far more unsettling place than he could have imagined.
"The kind of story which just draws you right in. All the characters, even the minor ones, seem real. It leaves you distinctly unsettled and it's not the kind that you will forget. I recommend it highly" Sam Tomaino, SF Revu
"Stunning⁩ – such a wonderful progression from gritty, urban normality into haunting, unspeakable terrors. I raced through it. Highly recommended!" David Cleden
"Haunting and deliciously odd and compelling. Read it" Andrew Hook
"This is top notch, low key horror/dark, urban fantasy that's definitely at the literary end of the scale. A reminiscence of early teenage-hood, the layers of the strange enclave the narrator grew up in are slowly lifted back and we are given a glimpse into a world that is at once terrifying in its implications and utterly compelling and believable. As much about family, friendships, and loyalty as it is about the mechanics of its location, this is a wonderfully written novella that gives just enough to satisfy, but also instils a desire for more. Lovely" Paul Feeney
B-format paperback, 96 pages on cream bookwove with matt laminated cover and wraparound art by Richard Wagner.